The fiction of sanity

“TAT abbrev. Thematic Apperception Test, one of the best known projective tests, consisting of 31 pictures (originally 20) of emotionally charged social events and situations printed on cards, from which the test administrator selects 20 depending on the age and sex of the respondent, plus a blank card that is presented last. For each picture, the respondent is asked to make up a story that the picture could illustrate, describing the relationship between the people, what has happened to them, what their present thoughts and feelings are, and what the outcome will be. The assumption underlying the test is that respondents tend to project their own circumstances, experiences, and preoccupations into their stories.” A Dictionary of Psychology

 

“It was hypothesized that there were a number of scorable dimensions in these TAT records which should differentiate the experimentals who had applied for therapy from the controls who had not, as well as differentiate the records before and after therapy. Six of these variables were used in this study:

“1. The ability of the hero to solve his own problems versus dependence on others or magical forces to do this.

“2. The degree and quality of the creativity; well-developed fantasy and well-structured stories versus inability to form a story, sticking rigidly to the stimulus, or bizarre fantasy.

“3. The quality of the emotions attributed to the characters; pleasant versus unpleasant, and the degree of control of these affect states displayed by the characters.

“4. The kinds of interpersonal relations the subject depicts in his stories; constructive versus destructive interaction.

“5. The degree of comfort versus disturbance of the heroes and the appropriateness of these states to the situational context.

“6. The logic and mood tone of the story outcomes, happy, successful, or hopeful versus despair, failure, or indecision.

“These six were not treated independently, however. A single composite rating was made for each record based on a seven-point scale with the following notations for the scale positions:

“1. Severe disturbance bordering on psychotic or psychotic.

“2. Severe neurotic problems with disorganization.

“3. Acute neurotic problems but reality contact tenuously preserved.

“4. Discomfort from problems severe enough to require therapy but ability to carry one.

“5. Particular problems of some difficulty but social effectiveness maintained.

“6. Only mild problems in essentially well-functioning person.

“7. Well-integrated, happy person, socially effective.”

Rosalind Dymond, ‘Adjustment Changes over Therapy from Thematic Apperception Test Ratings’, page 110, chapter 8, Psychotherapy and Personality Change, edited by Carl Rogers & Rosalind Dymond, 1954.

One thought on “The fiction of sanity”

  1. Supreme arrogance of second-rate minds. . .if you want to control, first you define and make sure yours is the only definition in town.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *